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This is starting to go beyond a joke. The biggest commercial (put your own term here) ever built. You know that they can build this thing, too. I don't get it. http://hermann.blog.com/1081099/

"Where are you when we need you most, Gerhard?"

He got the hell out of Dodge, while the gettin' was good. To borrow an old 'cowboy' phrase.

SPIEGEL should be pleased as punch about all this. After all, they were violently opposed to Airbus back in the day when it was just a glimmer in the eye of Franz Josef Strauss, a brilliant Bavarian conservative who was their arch-nemesis in those days. They only became Airbus cheerleaders after the company proved a success and began competing effectively with Boeing, evil minion of the American devils.

Many of us more unhinged anti-Airbus types will become overly concerned about the tiny press which this story will get in the MSM. We need to save our anger for more worthy targets. Consider:

The nature of news is to report the unexpected. @Man bites Dog' is a news story - the reverse is not. Considered in light of Airbus' recent history - is a (further) one year delay really a suprise? Or is it normal operations for Airbus given that the delay now reaches almost 2 years - and we really don't know what the final delay will be.

I think they should shoot for 2010 to be safe. That way they can have a relaunch for the '2010' - using Also Sprach Zarathustra as the sound track. Out wiht the 'A380' - in with: '2010 - A French Oddessy'.

What think? ;)

German Government Urged to Intervene in Airbus Crisis

Plans to move Airbus operations out of Germany as part of a cost-cutting plan have angered politicians and officials who are calling on the German government to intervene in a bid to retain investment in the firm....
http://www.dw-world.de/dw/article/0,2144,2193401,00.html

They can build it, but will the wings fall off before it lands????

That's part of their major problem, the wiring.

I first started following the Airbus saga earlier this year when I read Why Europe Will Run the 21st Century. It's written by a Mr. Mark Leonard who is describe on the jacket as "Director of Foreigh Policy at the Center for Euopean Reform, where he works on trans-atlantic, Middle East, and EU-China relations.' Also on the jacket is this precious gem - "The European Union owes its existence to America. Now, however, America needs to learn from the child that is raised out of the ashes of World War II, because that child has come of age."

(hey - I read this stuff so you guys don't have to - there's a tip jar around here somewhere........... And just so you know how much you should appreciate me, there's is a chapter titled - sit down, please - "The Revolutionary Power of Passive Aggression", the gist of which is that any regime can be bought and the EU is buying).

For some reason that I can't recall, I have it in my head that Leonard has some affiliation with Tony Blair also.

A blurb from his book regarding Airbus "...the Airbus sonsortium, which brought together European companies to comprehensively outperform the American Boeing Company, show that in many of the sectors of the future, the American board room is trailing Europe's lead."

Well, no. European governments subsidized European companies and the 'boardroom' was in Brussels, thank you very much. The entire construct speaks to the fact that the EU mentality is a soft totalitarianism.

Airbus is a metaphor for the EU. This particular aircraft was 1) designed by a committee 2)designed for a market that doesn't exist 3) designed for airports that cannot accomodate it 4) designed for air traffic control procedures that don't exist.

And my very favorite German word is 'schadenfruede'.

could I get any more typos in that sucker? jeez........

Richard North notes the risk to the EU posed by the Airbus debacle.

As troubles multiply for the European aerospace giant EADS, the Financial Times has been quoting Airbus Chief Executive Christian Streiff as saying that the revamp of the mid-size A350 XWB project could be at risk.

But more worrying are the implications for our defence capability as Streiff is also saying that the A400M – the military airlifter - could suffer cost overruns or delays.

I remember when that book came out, whatta maroon!

There is another hidden cost to the A380 delays -- the time delay to catch up with Boeing to compete with the 787 Dreamliner is also increasing.

Probably true, Don Miguel. I doubt that R&D on the A350 XWB is much at risk. I see the risk in that the A380 is going to take much more time (and production engineer expertise) to put right. Engineering talent does not grow on trees. Top engineers working on the A380 are not working on the A350 XWB. QED....

On another note, has anyone else thought of what they can call the A380 when they rebrand it? I was thinking of "The Chiraq".... ;)

Where are you when we need you most, Gerhard?

Looks like former German chancellor Gerhard Schroeder - now with Russia Inc. is coming to the rescue, but Angela isn’t very happy about it:

“German state development bank KfW plans to buy a 7.5 percent stake in European aerospace firm EADS (EAD.PA), parent of troubled planemaker Airbus, from car firm DaimlerChrysler (DCXGn.DE), a magazine reported on Saturday.“…
"Germany also wants to stop Russia from becoming too powerful. German Chancellor Angela Merkel has said it cannot be a core shareholder, although Moscow has said it wants to boost its 5 percent stake. “...
"An unconfirmed French newspaper report on Friday said Russia has already increased its stake to 6 or 7 percent."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/10/14/AR2006101400395.html

But seriously, Gerhard couldn’t have anything to do with this, could he?

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