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Why would one expect a mention of the 62nd anniversary of this event today? It's not exactly news, is it? And I didn't notice much of a mention in the MSM in England or the US either. I agree much of the German media is biased against America, but I don't think this is an instance of it. And their not mentioning this event would be as much of an indicator of bias against Britain and Canada as against America, which after all did as much on D-Day as America did.

@PJ
And their not mentioning this event would be as much of an indicator of bias against Britain and Canada as against America, which after all did as much on D-Day as America did.

The lack of attention EVERYWHERE is a bias - and I agree it's not just German media. You are correct in noting that the U.S. media has also been remiss.

But my guess is that if there were any way - at all - to spin history so that the French liberated Germany from the Nazis, LeMonde would be all over it like white on rice.

All the Allies pulled their weight except some of the Allies had more weight to pull. The British fielded 3 divisions with armor and commandos, the Canadians fielded 1 division and the US fielded 6 divisions also with armor and commando units. Specifically on the 6th of June no other army "did" as much as the American.

Ok, it is now 62 years ago..... but I can remember that 2 years ago, on the 60s anniversary that Gerhard Schröder was in France and had celebrate to an remembrance to the americans how had fight..... it is the day that had changed the 2nd world war, but it isnt an public holiday, nether in germany then in america or in great britain.

Thats the matter why you hadnt see nothing in the uk or us media about it.....

Note from David:

I don't think so...

The lack of coverage is also due to the fact that the 60th anniversary got such intense media coverage only two years ago. Arte has and is still showing a number of documentaries on D-Day, and I guess it's no coincidence that the concept for the new Checkpoint Charlie memorial will be presented in the Berlin city hall today. Still, would be nice to see at least some editorials.

Yeah the memorations 2 years ago and last year (60 years after the end of the war) had the feeling of a goodbye moment. I m sure you cant express it this way in english, but I dont know a better expression.

I dont think its a coincidence that since the last 1-2 years, our politicians dont really worry about the past anymore. It seems like we have finally gotten over it :)

My favorite D-Day picture is of two American GI's riding through a French town on a captured German "Kettenrad." A Kettenrad is a motorcycle/half-track hybird.

It turns out that the passenger on the Kettenrad was Lt.Col Strom Thurman of South Carolina. The Congressman (yeah, he was once a Congressman before he became a senator for 60 years)had been called up as an Army Reserve Officer. Strom, who could speak passable French, was assigned to a G-5 staff of an airborne unit. The G-5 sets up liaison between the Army and the local civilian government. Strom had parachuted into Normandy with the other heros of the airborne units on D-day.

It is true that D-Day goes unnotice in Germany. It's sad to say but while I grew up in Germany until I left to move to the United States I had never even heard of D-Day. Granted the allied invasion in Normandy is common knowledge, however not cause to reflect on what that meant for Germany, after all is was the beginning of losing the war. Why would you want to remember that? Credit for bringing freedom to europe, who are you kidding, you wouldn't want to admit the U.S. is going good in the world. The post-WWII world view held by Germans today would be disturbed. So I wouldn't expect any mention of the achievements of the U.S. in europe in the years to come. Sadly today's youth has moved even further away from associating with the values of ango-america than at the time I lived there.

Perhaps it's time we Americans take back D-Day. Look what the Europeans have done with the gift of freedom.

"Granted the allied invasion in Normandy is common knowledge, however not cause to reflect on what that meant for Germany, after all is was the beginning of losing the war. Why would you want to remember that?"

Actually, the beginning began a bit earlier and to the east. But I agree about why wanting to remember it.

I can't imagine they would want to remember it.

I'm sure most families had little influence over the direction their country took prior to the war, did their duty whether by choice or compulsion, and suffered greatly for it. I won't make a judgement based on contemporary mores.

Full disclosure: My in-laws are Japanese so I tend to be slightly more sympathetic to the losers than the average American. I could be wrong here, but I'm guessing the average German had about as much chance of influencing Hitler's rise to power as my in-laws did of stopping the Japanese invasion of China. (Or for that matter, as my great grandparents did of stopping the Spanish-American war.)

I think we were (and are) the good guys in this conflict, and it's better for both sides that we prevailed. I just have a lot of sympathy and respect for the guys on both sides who did their duty.

Pamela,

You might have missed this. It is too good not to share.

http://nihlist.blogspot.com/2006/06/top-11-things-that-anti-war-protesters.html

"Look what the Europeans have done with the gift of freedom."

Yes, damn them for building stable, democratic, free, prosperous societies and for serving as the front line of freedom throughout the Cold War. A Nazi- or Soviet-ruled, nuclear-armed Western Europe was clearly much more in America's interests.

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