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A) So, I take it they would be happy if we tossed the election results aside until we got a government of our liking?

B) So, If the election results came up with an out of nowhere Sunni win, would the same-said reporters be saying that it must be something the US did to help their Saudi friends?

C) The election that put Schroeder and his party into office didnt go the way the US wanted either. Funny how quiet everyone in Germany is over that.

For the Kurds and the Shias, the election was payback time. As for the Sunnis, the disenfranchised themselves. And with those disenfranchised Sunnis, enter their home grown "Jesse Jacksons" who bitch about the results. True that most Sunnis avoided the polls because of security concerns, particularly in the Sunni triangle. But Western oberservers who are still carping about the Iraqi elections should also take note that the Sunnis shot themselves in the foot.

What's amazing to point out is the restraint of the Shia and Kurdish communities in Iraq. They could have easily allied with each other, and eliminated the Sunnis in Iraq. (And when I say "eliminate," I mean along the lines genocide.) But they did not. Instead, the Shia and Kurds opted for a more peaceful and democratic means to express their rigthful anger and resentment after years of marginalization. The world should commend the Shias and Kurds for their actions.

The elections have come and gone, and still their is no civil war to speak of. True there is an insurgency, which is led by Abu Musab al-Zarqawi (who is Jordanian, not Iraqi) and his Sunni followers. But while civil wars are fought among the citizens of a country, the situation in Iraq pits Iraqis against foreign Islamists. All this talk about civil war is just another attempt by the Left to deligitimize the current government in Iraq and pray for another Vietnam. And with all the events that have transpired last month, the prayers have not been answered.

@ Carl

If the Sunni do not stop the bombing attacks on the Shia at some point it may come to that. It's is not the Shia and Kurd majority that is launching these attacks on civilians in Shia and Kurdish areas. Can anyone blame them when it happens? All the Sunni have to do is pick up the phone and turn the terrorists in. It's not happening. The Shia and Kurds are doing their part and have shown up to this point incredible restraint. No one can reasonably expect that to last for ever can they?


As far as the German media goes they and the rest of the 1968ers won't be happy until the Trasnzi elites run the whole world. Telling the truth in the news is secondary to that end. There are plenty of internationalist elites pushing the same thing here in the US. It's just that here they don't control all the major media or the government. Apparently in Germany most people don't care.


"N24's assertion ... is so far removed from reality that one has to wonder whether the network's editors are misinformed, uninformed or simply maliciously bad journalists."

Maybe they're just dumb.

Lebanese Broadcasting Co.'s satellite television news is reporting that the United Iraqi Alliance (UIA), comprising Shiite religious parties, has won an absolute majority (141 seats) after adjustments were made in accordance with electoral procedure.

Just a couple of things come to mind here. First off, the theocracy in Iran did not come into power through due electoral process, but through civil unrest. The current unrest in Iran informs the Iraqi Shia, in contrast to the Iranians who were effectively accepting an untested formula. Secondly, in Iraq - in contrast to Iran - there is no substantial Communist Party who are willing to co-operate and support the theocracy before being [insert euphamism here].

After being oppressed and suppressed for generations, why would Iraqi Arab Shiites want to voluntarily going under the thumb of Iranian Persian Shiites? Sistani is himself Iranian and many of the Iraqi Mullahs spent years in Iran and know the situation there very well. They've come to the conclusion, in line with 1000 year old Shiite theology, that Clerics ought not to be in power. Khomeini is actually a Shiite heretic. They've seen how power corrupts the clerics in Iran and stifles the people. Other than Moqtada Al-
Sadr, the Iraqi Shiite clerics have said often, they do not want a Mullahcracy in Iraq. Sistani has done everything to keep Shiites from retaliating against the Sunnis because of Sunni terrorists.

All of this theocracy threat in Iraq is more wishful hoping that the US fails in Iraq. Will failure in Iraq help Germany? Will American failure help Germany or Europe? No, it'll make the situation far worse. These people simply hate America so much, that they'll hurt their own country in order to see America hurt. What can create such a situaiton? In a word: Envy.

Well at least the media is moving closer now to the concerns of the Iraqis. I dont presume to know what all the Iraqis think but from their blogs a general concern before the election was semingly that some form of theocratic dictatorship sim to Iran was going to take away the freedoms that they had just gained. At that time the media was reporting alleged attrocities, terror and the likelyhood of a low turnout. They were wrong and on the election outcome being a disaster they are wrong too but have at least moved closer to the concerns expressed by a lot of Iraqis, after all it is their country. If anything this election outcome is perhaps a great chance for Iraq and the region. Because the new government is being viewed as not the USA´s first choice it may gain legitimacy among those who fear outside domination and spokespeople (ok so far just men but you never know) from the leading coalition have been making it very clear in every interview i have seen so far that they do not want to move towards a theocracy but rather make a form of democracy that has a muslim identity but that embraces freedom and individual rights. This is, if possible, an idea that is more likely to sell across the region and unite other people in different countries to push more towards democracy intheir own countries, especially if this system continues to experience the economic deveolpment that oil revenue and freedom are likely to bring it. Whether such a model is viable or not I dunno its just my 10c. Will have to read up on a few Iraqi blogs and see what the experts say rather than the German press. I agree though that this article does look suspiciously like an attempt to discredit the now undeniable success of the election. What do the rest of you think?

What is it with N24 anyway? It seems they despise the United States, but have some sort of fetish over aircraft carriers. All that aside, I always get the feeling that the "news" on N24 is produced with the object of getting a nice pat on the head from the more established broadcasters.

The Iraqis have continuously been underestimated. They want to be free. They already hold their democratic sovereignty more highly than the Europeans (who can't give their away fast enough). The Iraqis will never allow themselves to be shackled again.

"Professor" Westerwelle just finished giving the N24 interviewer in "Was erlauben Strunz?!" an Economics and Politics 101 class, and one on Manners to boot. He nuked the absurd leftist arguments of forcing a company into bankrupcy in order to "save" a few jobs - a position the interviewer cald "cold-blooded" politics - and rebutted with firmness but grace the disrespectful attempts to throw him off balance.
I don't share his liberal values at all, but boy does he make sense when he's talking politics and economics. Something rare today in Germany. That interviewer could not handle it and was not a happy person. I guess he'll have to interview 2 or 3 leftists in a row to recover from that one.

Below is a link to another article. I believe this article while a bit more optimistic than the normal reporting in elite german media does provide an interesting analysis of the results.

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,1072-1484686,00.html

@Joe

Thanks for posting that Times article link. I suggest other take the time to read it as well. I found this bit esp warming:

" My instinct is that the new assembly will be organised on the basis of political programmes rather than sectarian and/or ethnic identities with Arab nationalist, Islamists and liberals-conservatives blocs forming. But those who have known the new emerging Iraqi leadership for years know that almost all its members are united in their rejection of any new form of despotism. Having been liberated from Saddamism, few Iraqis would want to return to a state of virtual servitude, whether in the name of God or political ideology."

Thats what we want to see now...

The link below provides an even more interesting analysis of the election results in Iraq. It is a map overlay of voting turnout. If you have difficult in reading the map if you hit download it will pop up in a new window which you can enlarge. (or it did for me)

While the map is interesting I found the conjecture of its meaning to be equally interesting.

This type of graphic display would seem ideal for TV. I have not seen it, however. It might be Iraq has now OBE and the focus is shifting to the new rift between the US and Europe over Iran.

http://www.patrickruffini.com/archives/2005/02/the_iraqi_elect.php

Election Leaves Iraq in 'Quagmire of Compromise'
by Scott Ott

(2005-02-14) -- Results of the recent democratic elections in Iraq show that voters failed to fill the power vacuum created when Saddam Hussein's Baathist regime was overthrown, and instead elected a national assembly "destined to be a quagmire of compromise."


Just found!!!

http://www.hrw.org/english/docs/2005/02/23/iran10204.htm

Iran: Blogger Sentenced to 14 Years in Prison
Government Broadens Its Crackdown on Freedom of Expression

(New York, February 24, 2005)--The Iranian government sentenced the prominent blogger Arash Cigarchi to 14 years in prison for expressing his opinions on the Internet and in the international press, marking a new low for freedom of expression in Iran, Human Rights Watch said today. ...

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